The cancer course

Spoiler Alert – this one is a bit heavy …… 

Amongst every other bodily function chemo also mucks up your sleep pattern, it does mine anyway. I woke up at 5am today and, being the beginning of October, it was still dark. Strange thoughts were going through my head, not racing as I was still half asleep – not asleep enough to actually get back to the land of nod and not awake enough to crawl out to make some tea. 

I haven’t been frightened of the dark since I was a young kid, in fact I need a pitch black room in order to drop off, but laying there I felt scared. I thought about dying and the lead up to dying and how and where it might happen, as it surely will sooner rather than later. I thought how I really didn’t want to die in hospital because it’s so bloody noisy and none of the wards I’ve been in during the last four years strike me as conducive to a peaceful and dignified passing, either for me or for anyone who is there at the time, not that I’m expecting a crowd. I also decided that as much as I like our home I didn’t really want to die here either. I didn’t want my partner to have those bad memories when we’ve been so happy here, it just wouldn’t be fair on him, although he disagrees. So I figured that left me with a hospice, if I get the choice I mean, because none of us know when we will go and maybe, when the time comes I’ll feel differently. But a hospice seems so final, a major acceptance of my fate, something that I’ve put off admitting to myself and, whenever the thoughts have tried to come to the fore, I’ve dismissed them or, more accurately, I’ve pushed them away as quickly and with as much mental force as I could muster. However, laying there in bed in the darkness of the early October morning I allowed those thoughts to flow. I’m no less scared having done so but maybe a little further along. 

I think the catalyst for all this deep thinking was my oncologist appointment a couple of days ago when we spoke about future treatments after the chemo has finished as opposed to not needing any more treatment. I already knew chemo was not a cure in my case but talking openly in those terms has helped me. As I’ve always said, I’d rather know what’s going on and that is still the case. 

Once again that led me to thinking how this last four years (almost 5 now) has been like a training course in many ways, the cancer course is how I’m thinking of it, which I like better than “battle” or “struggle” or “fight”, all terms that imply to me that when I peg out it would be because I hadn’t battled, struggled or fought hard enough. 

I find there’s at least one more bit of learning every day but, unlike other courses I’ve done over the years, I’m not sure what counts as a “pass” in this one. Is getting totally cured the equivalent of an A+ or is it flunking out as a failure? If it’s the latter, does that make the final module, Death, an A+? If so, I’ll try to put off finishing the course and collecting my certificate for as long as possible. 

Meanwhile the dark thoughts are still there and if anything are more to the fore, and yet I feel a little more accepting, but no less scared, having let them flow. Is that another module of the cancer course completed? 

I should add, Im not expecting to go any time soon!! 

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One thought on “The cancer course

  1. I think that looking at your fears scores better on the course than running away from them, Jim. It is good to hear that you feel accepting of yours, including your fear.
    Thanks for the post. X

    Liked by 1 person

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