Chemo – my 2nd cycle

I’m having my 3rd lot of chemo tomorrow.

This second chemo cycle that’s just finishing has been pretty much like the first, except the pain wasn’t as intense in the first 10 or 11 days this time and I’ve been able to either stick to low dose painkillers or not take any at all a lot of the time, although not all the time. What was different about the pain was that it persisted at a very low level right up to a couple of days ago, like a nagging all over toothache that just wouldn’t go away.

I didn’t get the hoarseness and the hiccups this time but I did get the oral thrush and the loss of taste or, rather, the acquisition of a foul taste all the time that made most foods taste like I imagine how cow dung would be. Once again, I feel the need to emphasise that I have never (knowingly) eaten cow dung. As before, vanilla ice cream was one of the very few things that tasted good but I’ve found you really can have too much of a good thing. Who’d have thought I’d ever have turned down ice cream?

I explained to a friend who just had surgery that it’s the solemn duty of anyone in a hospital bed to constantly discuss their bowel habits. The same applies to anyone on chemo and, for that matter, every other sort of cancer treatment because they all either bung you up or give you the trots or make you alternate between the two extremes. At least, they did with me. So, in order not to let the side down, I can report constipation started very quickly after my second chemo treatment despite having started taking Movicol the day before to try to pre-empt the inevitable. This time everything felt more compacted and persisted longer than during the first cycle. It took 8 days before there was any significant movement and I was able to leave off the Movicol and go back to white bread and low fibre cereal and what a relief it was, too.

Like my facial hair the hair on my head has virtually stopped growing, but not quite. I have some bum fluff type stuff on my face that grows so slowly I can get away without shaving for around 2 weeks and I still have a thin covering of hair over most of my head, although it looks to me to be patchy in places and I wonder why I’m holding on to it.

With so many meds swirling around my system I’ve been having mood swings. Things settle down as the cycle goes on but it doesn’t take much to make me the opposite of whatever I happen to be feeling at any given time. Whereas normally I’d just put up with things that annoy me or I think are daft, now I think “sod it, why should I“, and say what I’m thinking. I try not to, but the words are out before I can stop myself and I find I’ve upset somebody. Chemo seems to have made me very stroppy, or should that be “more stroppy“?

A few days after my last treatment I found out why you really shouldn’t try to cook something you haven’t made for years when you have chemo brain. I looked for something on the Web that I thought I’d be able to taste and would be nutritious and found a recipe for kedgeree, but I was so totally disorganised that I didn’t know what I was doing, made loads more than I’d intended and then couldn’t eat it because it tasted just like everything else – the aforementioned cow dung. My partner assured me it was nice but with my snappy mood swings he was probably too scared to say anything else.

During the first half of both cycles I’ve found it difficult to concentrate, to think and to remember words. Things get progressively better during the second half, but I’m aware I’m not as on the ball as I usually am. I’m also not as physically able as before and I get tired easily.

Six days after my last treatment I went to the weekly Cancer Choir Research group that I’ve been part of for the last couple of months. The choir itself is enjoyable, maybe in part because I’m right out of my comfort zone and am learning something new, but the journey there and back is a pain and tiring even when things go smoothly. On that day things did not go smoothly. The trains were disrupted on the way home and it was a hot and humid evening. I was in a very crowded Marylebone Station and for the first time I had to ask for assistance. I was helped into an office that was air conditioned and given a bottle of water, but later declined the lift on the disabled buggy to me take up the platform. For me that would have been too much of an admission that things have changed. I just hope they haven’t changed permanently. At least, not yet.

I currently get my blood tested every 3 weeks as part of the chemo and last time the PSA had gone up, but when I saw my oncologist today I found out that the tests done 2 days ago showed my PSA has gone down a bit this time, which was great to hear and made the cow dung I’ve been enduring all worth it.

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One thought on “Chemo – my 2nd cycle

  1. Thanks, Jim. Great stuff. Chilean red wines have cow dung ‘on the nose’, for me, and I love them. Could this thought help?!
    Allow yourself to say yes to help. It is very grown up to do so, and Colin might be pleased to see you accept assistance. I hope I shall do so when I need to … X

    Like

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